Find Out the Classification and Regulation of Dangerous Goods!

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Dangerous Goods

Dangerous goods refer to goods or materials that have a potential hazard or risk to safety, human health, the environment or property. This term is used to describe goods that have properties that can cause accidents or harm if not handled properly.

Examples of this goods include toxic chemicals, flammable materials, high pressure gases, corrosive materials, radioactive materials, infectious materials, explosive materials, and so on. For example, toxic chemicals such as pesticides or industrial chemicals that are dangerous if exposed directly to humans or the environment. High pressure gases such as gas cylinders can explode if not handled carefully. Radioactive material that can damage the cells of the human body or the environment when exposed to radiation.

Transport or handling of this goods must be carried out carefully and in accordance with applicable regulations and procedures. Organizations such as the International Air Transport Association (IATA) and the International Maritime Organization (IMO) have established strict rules and guidelines to govern the international transport of dangerous goods.

It is important to understand the characteristics and risks associated with dangerous goods and to follow appropriate safety measures to reduce the potential hazard and protect life and the environment. Learn more through the following TransTRACK article!

Classification of dangerous goods

The following is a classification of dangerous goods based on their characteristics:

Explosives

  • Explosives that have the potential to explode or cause an explosion when exposed to heat, friction or pressure.
  • Examples: explosives, ammunition, firecrackers, improvised explosives.

Material Gas (Material Gas)

Material Gas is a category in the classification of this goods which refers to gases that have a potential hazard or risk to the safety and health of humans, the environment or property. This category can be divided into several sub-categories based on the nature and characteristics of the gas. Some of the common sub-categories within gaseous materials are as follows:

Flammable Gas

  • Gas that can burn or explode when exposed to flames or heat sources.
  • Examples: propane, butane, hydrogen, methane.

Non-Flammable Gas

  • A gas that is not flammable, but can still cause other hazards such as health effects or suffocation if inhaled.
  • Examples: nitrogen, helium, argon.

Toxic Gases

  • Gas which can cause poisoning if inhaled in high concentrations.
  • Example: chlorine gas, ammonia gas, cyanide gas.

It is important to understand that the classification of this goods can be more detailed and have more sub-categories according to their characteristics and risks. Each category has different rules and requirements for safe transport, handling and storage.

Flammable Liquid

The following is an additional classification for dangerous goods:

Flammable Liquid

  • Liquid with a low flash point which can ignite easily when exposed to flames or heat sources.
  • Examples: gasoline, solvent oil, lubricants, alcohol.

Flammable Solids

  • Solid objects that can catch fire easily when exposed to flames or heat sources.
  • Examples: matches, phosphorus, oxidizing agents.

Combustible Solids

  • Solids that can burn if exposed to heat or flame, but have a higher melting point or flash point than other flammable solids.
  • Example: dry wood, paper, plastic.

Explosive Solids

  • Solid objects that have the potential to explode if exposed to heat, friction or pressure.
  • Example: solid explosives, detonators.

Solid Objects Become Gases and Flammable When Contact with Water (Self-Reactive Substances and Solid Desensitized Explosives)

  • Solids which can react with water or moisture to produce flammable gases.
  • Examples: sodium, potassium, picric acid.

This classification of this goods is important for safe transportation, handling and storage. Each category has different requirements in terms of packaging, labeling and protection needed to reduce the risk of accidents or hazards that may arise.

Oxidation (Easy to Oxidize)

The following is an additional classification for dangerous goods:

Oxidizing Substances

  • Chemicals that can cause the oxidation or combustion of other materials, even if they are not self-flammable.
  • Examples: hydrogen peroxide, chlorate, sodium nitrate.

Oxidizing Agents

  • Chemicals that have the ability to support combustion and increase the speed of oxidation reactions.
  • Example: chlorine, nitric acid, hydrochloric acid.

Oxidizing Organics (Organic Peroxides)

  • Organic compounds containing peroxide groups, which may undergo exothermic decomposition or spontaneously explode.
  • Examples: hydrogen peroxide, dibenzoyl peroxide, methyl ethyl ketone peroxide.

Dangerous goods in the category of oxidizing substances, oxidizing agents and organic peroxides have properties that can increase the risk of fire and trigger dangerous reactions if not handled properly. Therefore, strict safety precautions and procedures must be followed when transporting, storing and using materials in this category.

Toxic and Infectious Materials

The following is an additional classification for dangerous goods:

Toxic substances (Toxic)

  • Chemicals or substances that have the potential to cause poisoning or harmful effects on humans or other living things if exposed.
  • Examples: mercury, arsenic, cyanide, insecticides.

Infectious Substances

  • Material that contains pathogens (disease-causing microorganisms) and can cause infection or disease in humans or animals on exposure.
  • Examples: viruses, bacteria, bacterial spores, cultures of pathogenic microorganisms.

Dangerous goods in the category of toxic substances and communicable substances require very careful protection and handling. Proper waste transport, packaging and disposition must be followed to minimize risks of exposure to humans and the environment. There are strict regulations governing the transportation and handling of toxic and easily transmitted goods to maintain public safety and health.

The following is an additional classification for dangerous goods:

Radioactive Materials (Radioactive Materials)

  • Materials containing radioactive substances that emit ionizing radiation and have a potential radiation hazard to humans and the environment.
  • Examples: uranium, plutonium, medical radioisotopes.

Corrosive Substances

  • Chemicals that are corrosive and can damage materials such as metals, skin, and living tissue.
  • Examples: sulfuric acid, sodium hydroxide, nitric acid.

Other Dangerous Substances and Objects (Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods)

  • This category includes a variety of dangerous goods that are not included in the previous categories.
  • Examples: lead acid batteries, magnetic materials, hazardous waste.

Dangerous goods in the category of radioactive materials, corrosive substances and other dangerous substances and objects have unique characteristics and risks that must be handled carefully in accordance with applicable regulations and procedures. Safe transport, packaging and handling are necessary to protect human health, prevent environmental damage and ensure public safety.

Dangerous Goods Regulations

Regulations for dangerous goods can vary from country to country and are regulated by various international agencies and organizations. The following are some regulations that are generally applied:

International Air Transport Association (IATA) Dangerous Goods Regulations

  • Regulations applicable to the carriage of dangerous goods by air.
  • Regulate packaging, labeling, documentation and safe handling requirements.

International Maritime Organization (IMO) International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code

  • Regulations applicable to the transport of dangerous goods by sea.
  • Establish requirements for packaging, labeling, documentation and safe handling on ships and ports.

United Nations (UN) Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods

  • Guidelines developed by the United Nations (UN) for the general transport of dangerous goods.
  • Includes definitions, classifications, test methods and general requirements for the transport and handling of dangerous goods.

National and Regional Regulations

  • Each country has its own national regulations for the transport, handling and storage of dangerous goods.
  • Examples are the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) in the United States, the Dangerous Goods Safety Act in Australia, and the Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres Regulations in the European Union.

It is important for those involved in the transport and handling of dangerous goods to understand and comply with applicable regulations. This involves special training, use of suitable packaging, proper labeling, and understanding of relevant safety procedures to prevent accidents or hazards to humans and the environment.

In facing the challenges of transporting and handling dangerous goods, a solution that can help improve security, compliance and efficiency is to use the Fleet Management System from TransTRACK.

TransTRACK’s Fleet Management System is an integrated platform specifically designed for the transport of dangerous goods industry. By using this system, companies can effectively monitor and manage the entire fleet of vehicles used in the transport of dangerous goods.

With the TransTRACK Fleet Management System, companies can carry out real-time tracking of dangerous vehicles and cargo that are on their way. Information regarding the location, status and condition of vehicles can be accessed easily, thus enabling management to take necessary actions in the event of an emergency or accident.

Make TransTRACK’s Fleet Management System a trusted solution to optimize the transportation and handling of dangerous goods in your company. Get better security, compliance and efficiency with TransTRACK. Contact us now for more information.

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